What the future of passenger space looks like

Airplanes are sterile. Probably not for the pilots. And unfortunately, for passengers, it’s true. Boring passenger spaces, physical inattention to bodies, it’s all there. But now, after the publication of several additional stories, we’re…

What the future of passenger space looks like

Airplanes are sterile. Probably not for the pilots. And unfortunately, for passengers, it’s true. Boring passenger spaces, physical inattention to bodies, it’s all there. But now, after the publication of several additional stories, we’re beginning to see, with increased regularity, the emergence of physically uninviting passenger spaces and facilities. The coverage of this trend has been fragmented in the past.

• The Airline Business Eye: Roughly 100 planes are breaking out of society’s current design constraints.

• The Edge: The passengers of the future are different. They’re in more pain, even.

• Shutterstock: The jobs that children will do when their education ends.

“Children don’t need education,” an advisory council member says, “they need a mother.”

• Wikimedia: Coming to a high school near you: Walking tests.

Since 2006, scientists and high school principal Danny Chadwick have been testing it on 200 students at North Carolina Central University every Friday.

• HuffPost: Playing football isn’t just about how big you are — it’s about how much you move and how fast you run.

More than 20 studies of top high school football players have detailed the impact of slamming into a wooden block and the ways that the dynamic forces carry forward through the rest of a player’s body.

• Intelligencer: 10 countries that aren’t interested in meeting America’s challenges.

Facing these crises presents one challenge after another. To solve them, the United States needs a longer-term foreign policy that commits the country to building global institutions instead of leading them from behind.

• CBS News: A career in the Navy has included a mission with a stinger missile.

On its more than 150 deployments, service members have seen their best days, and their worst. Many times, the only thing that saved them was their ability to reload the weapon on their wrist.

• Quartz: Palestinians, Jews, Syrians struggle to make peace.

Conversations are part of life in the Middle East, as well as business in the region. Rather than bluster, dialogue is used to create cooperative projects and lead talks that could begin solving the conflicts between countries and peoples.

• The Daily Beast: Baby Richard Nelson Mandela — the one who played tennis in his crib.

Former President Mandela’s 93-year-old grandson wasn’t ready to retire. Not with a serious family illness, a little sibling, and a two-minute tennis racket rattling around his crib every night.

• The New York Times: Donald Trump’s new advisers — with some quirks.

The group’s first meeting in April was distinguished by its personalities and narrative twists, but their eventual efforts could be more conventional than many suspect.

Leave a Comment