The Rise of the Race Wars

Op-Ed: Racial divides in Los Angeles politics are wrong morally and pragmatically

As of July 27, 2017, there are 11 openly racist elected officials left in the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors, all of whom face primary election challenges from Democrats in the fall, according to a San Gabriel Valley Tribune report.

The report also suggests that the number of racially charged encounters between police officers and African Americans in Los Angeles County has reached nearly 1,300 a year, a number which has been steadily increasing over the last three decades.

While the majority of the incidents and encounters are minor and involve police officers, it is worth noting that the majority of incidents and encounters are in predominantly African-American neighborhoods.

These incidents are not isolated, as African Americans have been disproportionately the victim of police violence in Los Angeles for decades. However, the numbers are alarming.

It is time to change the culture of police violence and police misconduct, which has only been exacerbated by an increasing number of openly racist elected officials. This will include changing the way we police, a system that should never have existed in the first place, but has become its own evil.

While the number of racially charged encounters and incidents involving African Americans is at a high, so is the number of African Americans suffering from police violence and misconduct.

According to the 2015 report by the ACLU of Southern California, African Americans and Latinos are twice as likely to be victims of police violence than white people.

When you compare incidents, the percentage of African American victims of police violence is about 1 percent compared to 6 percent of white victims of police violence.

When you compare incidents, the percentage of African American victims of police violence is about 1 percent compared to 6 percent of white victims of police violence.

When you compare incidents, the percentage of African American victims of police violence is about 1 percent compared to 6 percent of white victims of police violence.

When you compare incidents, the percentage of African American victims of police violence is about 1 percent compared to 6 percent of white victims of police violence.

When you compare incidents, the percentage of African American victims of police violence is about 1 percent compared to 6 percent of white victims of police violence.

When you compare incidents, the percentage of African American victims of police violence is about 1 percent compared to 6 percent of white victims of police violence.

When you compare incidents, the percentage of African American victims

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