The cars that Chinese millennials drive

Written by By Sasha Masterfield and Ed Smith, World Car Fans Launched in 1998, the low-polluting, high-performance EVs Xian had become one of China’s best-selling car models. One of China’s most popular car models,…

The cars that Chinese millennials drive

Written by By Sasha Masterfield and Ed Smith, World Car Fans

Launched in 1998, the low-polluting, high-performance EVs Xian had become one of China’s best-selling car models.

One of China’s most popular car models, the Xian produced the compact driving enthusiast most often found behind the wheel of one of the latest versions of Japan’s iconic Supermini.

One of the cars most popular with Chinese millennials is the Renault LeBreton. courtesy Renault

In China at the turn of the century the car’s allure did not disappear. It is now the majority of the cars these consumers own.

“Now, around 80% of households in China own a brand-new car,” stated Cui Junfeng, Associate Professor at the Center for Economics and Business Research, China’s E-Commerce University. “But this is mainly due to the popularity of the low-polluting cars.”

And as the Chinese have increasingly embraced new-generation EVs and now hold a significant market share for electric vehicles, their automotive counterparts across the world are quickly following suit.

Transportation systems across Europe are taking note

“China is now the world’s biggest market for electric vehicles and will continue to be for some time. Today the volume of cars equipped with electric engine is expected to increase by 10% per year until 2020.” This represents almost 60 million new EVs per year.

However, China’s competitors are not standing still.

“Chinese car manufacturers have completely disrupted the regional dynamics of the domestic auto industry, and foreign car manufacturers are attempting to catch up,” added Cui.

Renault LeBreton is just one of the cars that owners of these EVs consider their childhood playthings.

One of the reasons that Chinese car makers managed to dominate these markets was due to some of the problems faced by the EV industry in other parts of the world.

The model is fitted with a 0.8-liter gasoline engine producing 200 horsepower. It achieves 97.4 km/h and keeps the CO2 emissions at 120g/km, leaving the car classification R2 at the lowest classification, according to the regional emission rating.

“EVs have made a very positive contribution to the development of the global automotive industry. Through its technological prowess in electric vehicles, China has become a pioneer in global innovation.

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