Here’s what an almost-full moon looks like … right before a total lunar eclipse

There was a lunar eclipse Friday morning, which saw a darker outer edge of the sun cast onto the moon’s surface. The TV experts said that it looked like “a volcanic crater.” So that,…

Here’s what an almost-full moon looks like … right before a total lunar eclipse

There was a lunar eclipse Friday morning, which saw a darker outer edge of the sun cast onto the moon’s surface. The TV experts said that it looked like “a volcanic crater.” So that, too, is a site, right?

OK, so NASA says the lunar eclipse was not actually a volcanic crater. But a bit of context for you. One of the glowing details found in the eclipse, the upper-left edge of the eclipse shadow, is called an umbra. It is a total lunar eclipse where the moon is a full moon, but it is also surrounded by the region surrounding the Earth. The darker areas of the shadow are what NASA calls the umbra, which is where the volcano described above is located. That particular moon would have been 13 miles above the surface of the Earth.

You can also count on planets, water vapor and other stellar elements seen around the Earth and even in space to simulate the effect of volcanic activity. If you use the Carina, Chornobyl or Yamal eruptions to visualize the eclipse, you’ll see different colors coming from the moon.

The eruption of the Pinatubo volcano in the Philippines was visible from the rest of the world in September 1991, when it was 74 percent larger than expected and its depth was wider than predicted.

But that’s not why we went there. All that is attached to the volcanic lava crater were a few colorful pictures. There are half a dozen volcanoes that have been documented in the Philippines, including Mount Batanes, Mount Leong, Mount Pinatubo and Mount Mabilco (the largest active volcano in the Philippines).

If you’re headed to the Philippines before or after this lunar eclipse, you should definitely check out some of the volcanic scenes — including photos of Mount Mabilco’s four past eruptions — to see more of what the Philippines is really like.

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