Ex-Tory MP Charlie Elphicke to become Universal Credit adviser

Image copyright PA Image caption Elphicke was jailed last year for a string of sexual assaults Former Conservative MP Charlie Elphicke will begin work as an allowance adviser for the Universal Credit on Monday…

Ex-Tory MP Charlie Elphicke to become Universal Credit adviser

Image copyright PA Image caption Elphicke was jailed last year for a string of sexual assaults

Former Conservative MP Charlie Elphicke will begin work as an allowance adviser for the Universal Credit on Monday – following his conviction for sexual assault and two counts of rape.

The 39-year-old was jailed in November 2016 and in August last year.

Mr Elphicke, who was suspended from the Conservative Party by the Prime Minister after he was charged, said he did not feel like he had “competent support” while in jail.

Universal Credit is now being rolled out across England.

Prime Minister Theresa May has described the former MP as a “convicted sex offender”.

Universal Credit aims to reform the welfare system by making it easier for people to be “self-employed” and using computer technology to move people on to cashless benefits.

The “workers’ allowance” scheme is a start-up allowance that the coalition says would help millions of people make ends meet and remain in the UK.

The payments are paid to people if they meet a minimum weekly income amount, regardless of whether or not they’re working.

It is optional to sign up, and not yet mandatory in a big way.

But a preliminary plan for the future of the scheme has already been published by the Department for Work and Pensions.

Universal Credit will be available to 20 million people by October 2019.

Irate former Tory MP for Dover Charlie Elphicke – who branded the Prime Minister a “retard” after he was convicted of sexual assault and rape – to become Universal Credit allowance adviser pic.twitter.com/PwtDT29uSd — BBC Political Spotlight (@BBCPoliticalSctr) September 23, 2017

Mr Elphicke will not qualify for benefits himself, nor will he claim for anyone else.

Instead, it will be up to Jobcentre staff to refer people he thinks is in need of help to him.

He told BBC Newsnight that he may have taken advantage of his position as an MP to prey on women, but insisted he would not continue to “take advantage” of women.

He said he had suffered from depression and was the victim of “sex and ego”.

And he said people needed to know about the process for getting help and information.

It’s not yet clear whether there will be any repercussions for Mr Elphicke following his crime.

He recently sent out a press release to say he had been working as an adviser and plan.

But fellow Tories have distanced themselves from him.

Many asked who elected him, and have questioned whether his “crime” was even taken seriously by his party or public.

Government plans to use confidential cases and allegations of misconduct before dropping an accusation are said to be one way to deal with concerns about misconduct of an MP.

At one stage in the Elphicke case, the then-party chairman, Patrick McLoughlin, referred the case to party headquarters for review.

Since his conviction, the Conservatives have removed the “Independent MP” moniker they gave him at one point.

Mr Elphicke could not be reached for comment.

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