Archie Moore, whose wife was fatally shot in Maryland, asked for a plea deal in his own case

Archie Moore, whose wife, Rekia Boyd, was fatally shot in Prince George’s County, had asked a defense attorney for a plea deal, the attorney said. But Moore had “no say” in the matter, attorney…

Archie Moore, whose wife was fatally shot in Maryland, asked for a plea deal in his own case

Archie Moore, whose wife, Rekia Boyd, was fatally shot in Prince George’s County, had asked a defense attorney for a plea deal, the attorney said.

But Moore had “no say” in the matter, attorney Sam Davis told The Washington Post on Thursday, noting that the plea agreement with Antonio Davon Brown calls for a life sentence.

A jury in December convicted Brown, 21, of second-degree murder and related charges related to Boyd’s 2014 shooting death. The shooting took place as she left a Target store with her two young children.

Prosecutors say she had tried to fight back against Brown after he demanded the mother of his two children turn over her purse. Brown, who was 16 at the time, argued that Boyd had no standing to protect herself.

Police officers caught up with Brown the day after the fatal shooting. He was hiding out in a store parking lot on the George Washington Parkway. While police were searching for him, Brown told officers that he shot Boyd. Authorities discovered a handgun at the scene.

Davis, the attorney, said he hoped Brown would not get a life sentence but was not sure about his client’s choice.

“When you get that news, you’re going to do everything in your power to make sure that person never gets out again,” Davis said. “Sometimes they get to be sentenced to 25, 30 years. Sometimes it’s 30, 40, 50.”

Davis said Brown’s mother, who is pregnant, is the kind of mother who would not want her son to be locked up for life.

Kelsie Barton, Boyd’s mother, also said she had hoped to have a chance to speak to Brown and at least ask him about his choice to shoot Boyd. She doesn’t think Brown was someone to avoid.

“What is your father, where’s his father, where’s your mother?” Barton said. “Where are the people who raised you? Where are the people that loved you?”

Following the conviction, some who marched with Boyd last year where there was a large reaction to a Facebook post by her cousin Marah Williams. They went after community leaders who they felt were not doing enough to try to keep young people from getting shot. The Black Lives Matter founder Jeremy Johnson said that soon after the verdict, a group of young people began gathering at his work, Johnson Enterprise Inc., calling for an end to violence. They were demanding change.

“There’s got to be someone out there who knows something,” Johnson said on Wednesday at the 9th District AME Church in Southeast D.C. “This community is tired. This community is hurting.”

In a recently released statement, Boyd’s mother said the family was disappointed in the verdict.

“We look forward to the trial’s outcome and hope that this time we will have someone find a plea or sentencing deal for my family,” Barton said.

Despite the nightmarish circumstances, Barton said her family has not given up fighting for justice.

“They didn’t just take my baby from me,” she said. “They took them all.”

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